The Galilee Community Development Corporation Summer Academy is almost complete. It’s been weeks of learning and fun, but most importantly, it’s a summertime haven for the kids to learn their history and grow.” They can actually see that this isn’t something we read about. How can we prevent this from happening again? Not just for ourselves, but for others in our community,” said Dr. Eric Johnson, senior pastor of the Greater Galilee. More recently, campers visited the Roots 101 African American Heritage museum. This is just one of many field trips they have done this summer. “They went to the National Underground Museum in Cincinnatti. They met a cousin of Frederick Douglass. They went to Kurst Beach. They went to Huber’s Farm. “, Johnson said. Johnson oversees the summer camp and says they started it to empower the community.” We saw a lot of negativity in our community in terms of family structure, education, economy, and so we decided to do something about it,” Johnson said. Camper Natalie says she learned a lot during his first year at camp, such as when they traveled to Cincinnati and learned about the Underground Railroad.”It was part of our history and we need to know our history,” Natalie said. counselors at the camp are students. Johnson says it’s his way of not only helping to ensure that local students return to school with some money in their pocket, but he wants students to see young adults who are continuing their education.” They start to believe in who they are. They understand that they’re not limited, they’re not a handicap, they don’t have to be stuck in certain situations economically, sociologically… they come here and what they try most to to do is give them hope and give them a vision, not only have my vision, but tell them you can have my vision,” Johnson said. Through the community development corporation and local partnerships, they work to make sure it’s affordable. No family pays more than $70 per camper each week, with three meals included. the hope is that the experiences offered by the camp will open their minds and show them that anything is possible.

The Galilee Community Development Corporation Summer Academy is almost complete. It was weeks of learning and fun, but above all, it was a summer haven where the children could learn their history and grow.

“They can actually see that it’s not something we read about. It actually happened. How can we prevent it from happening again? Not just for ourselves, but for others in our community” , said Dr. Eric Johnson, senior pastor. of the Greater Galilee.

More recently, campers visited the Roots 101 African American Heritage Museum. It’s just one of many field trips they’ve had this summer.

“They went to the National Underground Museum in Cincinnatti. They met a cousin of Frederick Douglass. They went to Kurst Beach. They went to Huber’s Farm,” Johnson said.

Johnson oversees the summer camp and says they started it to empower the community.

“We saw a lot of negativity in our community in terms of family structure, education, economy, and so we decided to do something about it,” Johnson said.

Camper Natalie says she learned a lot during her first year at camp, like when they traveled to Cincinnati and learned about the Underground Railroad.

“It was part of our history and we need to know our history,” Natalie said.

Most camp counselors are students. Johnson says it’s his way to not only help ensure local students return to school with some cash in their pockets, but he wants students to see young adults who are continuing their education.

“They’re starting to believe in who they are. They understand that they’re not limited. They’re not a liability. They don’t have to be stuck in certain situations economically, sociologically…they come here and what ‘the most they’re trying to do is give them hope and give them a vision, not just to have my vision, but to let them know that you can have my vision,’ Johnson said.

Through the community development corporation and local partnerships, they make sure it’s affordable. No family pays more than $70 per camper each week, with three meals included.

“We make sure that if any of them are in some sort of desert food situation, they can take food home with them through backpacks,” Johnson said.

Johnson says he hopes the experiences offered by the camp will open their minds and show them that anything is possible.